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Florida 11, U.s. 10, Merkel 7, Ukraine 7, Obama 4, Us 4, Jazeera America 4, America 4, Mers 3, Monsanto 3, Maria Innes Ferre 3, Al Jazeera 3, Northern Ireland 3, Afghanistan 3, New York City 3, Russia 3, Dennis 2, Libby Casey 2, United Nations 2, Robert Ray 2,
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  Al Jazeera America    News    Top news stories of the day  
   from America and around the world.  

    May 2, 2014
    6:00 - 7:01pm EDT  

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cooperation, not domination... >> and inspiration... >> i want for women whatever they want for themselves... >> and the unconventional future of the movement >> they're many faces for feminism, including beyonce' >> talk to al jazeera only on al jazeera america >> this is al jazeera america. live from new york city, i'm david shuster, with a look at today's stories. flames and fighting are now the most intense since the crisis began. at the white house, president obama and german chancellor merkel, step up and threaten russia with more sanctions. in afghanistan, a landslide burst thousands,.
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and the economy is gaining steam. the unemployment rate drops to its lowest level in six years. the conflict in ukraine is getting worse. today the ukrainian army launched a preemptive attack on the eastern part of the country. those forces however armed with rocket launchers aimed an shooting down two helicopter pilots. when prowrg prowrgs pro-russian. >> purports to show what the
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residents are slovyansk and the pro-russian procrastinates who made the eastern city their base woke to at dawn. the ukrainian army launched what it described as a large scale antiterrorist operation. the apparent objective for now not to overrun the city but to form a blockade around it. some separatists said they were ready to fight. i will fight with whatever i have, if not a rifle then i will fight with my hands and strangle them so they won't mess with my lands. sophisticated surface to air missiles, something the government in kyiv points to as evidence of russian involvement on the ground. this man is said to be a survivor from one of the helicopters, a ukrainian survivor, in custody of
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separatist survivors inside slovyansk, four men arrested at a checkpoint said to be among those responsible for the helicopter attacks. in the city center the mood was extremely tense. video posted on the internet shows the self-proclaimed mayor of slovyansk offering a message of support. our town has been attacked. our town has been stormed. there are losses. i'm asking children women and pensioners not to leave their homes. i think we will be payable to defend our town. >> as armed men kept watch, deferences were reinforced at times it seemed like with the help of hel civilians. on several parallel streets around the center, rebuff the attackers here.
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request. >> reporter: this is video released of ukrainian defense, it is unclear how much ground the army has taken around slovyansk or how effective its attempted blockade of the city now is. unclear also what it plans to do next. jonah hull, al jazeera, donetske. the u.n. held an emergency session today after russia asked for a public law meeting on the situation in ukraine. john terret is live in new york city. john. >> seeking to get their message on the front pages of the newspapers tomorrow the russian spokesperson in the council said ukraine and its western backers are simply not abiding which the april geneva accord which has pretty much fallen apart and calling upon the u.s. to rethink its position vis-a-vis the
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ukraine and the crimea. proportional and measured response, the hypocrisy he said was breathtaking. samantha power, the u.s. ambassador to the united nations, said that the restraint shown by ukraine was breathtaking and remarkable, while ukraine has done everything to try to end this peacefully, russia on the other hand has gone on a territory grab. here is more of what power had to say. >> as its country has become carved up. as masses of russian troops have intlbled looresembled along itse border, ukraine has quownls dayy
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day after day responded remarkably. >> david. >> john is there any confidence at the united nations that the diplomats can at least find a way to contain the crisis to a battles between pro-russian force he and the ukrainian military without it getting any larger? >> i think facts on the ground speak for themselves. this is where the world comes to dough bait these kinds of issues. but look at the example we heard yesterday from be u.n. are scearnl basceablgsecretary genen ki-moon. >> this was merkel's first visit
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to the united states since documents leaked by former national security agency contractor edward snowden monitored her cell phone. milkily by their shared sense of -- publicly over their shared public sense of urgency. libby casey reports. libby. >> just months ago, these meetings would be far more intense, far more icy. but how far to push russia with sanction they fount unity at today's press conference. >> president obama and president merkel stood side by side and spoke with one voice,. >> if in fact we see the disruptions and the destabilization continuing, so severely that it impedes
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elections on may 25th, we will not have a choice but to move forward with additional, more severe sanctions. >> i agree with the american president. that they are not an end in itself. but combined with the offer that we want diplomatic solution is it is a very necessary second component to show that we are serious, serious about our principles. >> reporter: but just what form sanctions would take is still in question. pownl has pressed european -- president obama has pressed european leaders. but europe is reliant on russian flows of oil and gas. >> at the height of the cold war, the idea that you're going to turn off the tom, on all russian oil or natural gas,.
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>> unlikely just a few months ago. germ my's eersdz is still merkel's private phone calls. the chancellor said there is room to cooperate over over intelligence. >> surveillance trying to protect the citizens against threats. and on the other hand, protecting the individual privacy and individual freedom. >> president obama said he was pained to see the degree to which the snowden disclosures had strained both his personal relationship with merkel and a strong u.s. alliance with germany. he tried to assure germans that regular citizens are not subject to surveillance. >> what i've tried odo is take the unprecedented step of ordering our intelligence communities to take the privacy
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of of normal u.s. dissention into everything they do. >> the president saying the u.s. doesn't have such an arrangement with any of its closest partners. >> david, the story is that you were talking about an agreement along these lines and then pulled back on it. the president said no we never had that as a plan. while we are interested in some intelligence sharing, privacy-sharing, we'll see how that plays out, because many of the reporters from germany are very interested on the u.s. position on spying and how chancellor merkel is was responding to the president's words. >> lobby, be merkel having the
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most contact with the russian president did she havefully sense? >> can be found but she was putting sanctions on the table and she was talking about next steps. she like president obama holdings out these late may elections as a critical date and while they are certainly saying that the ball is in president putin's court, they didn't sound overrulely optimistic. now be angela merkel has spoken with president putin more than any other european leader. she just spoke to him yesterday. >> be libby casey, thanks for that report. hundreds of people are believed to be dead after a landslide buried an eastern province of afghanistan. officials are trying to crest cue people burr yeahed under several feet of mud.
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the governor also says the scale of the devastation there leaves little hope of finding survivors, so the area may be turned into a mass grave. our meteorologist kevin corriveau is here with more. kevin. >> david, this is one of the places where you really don't want to see this because it is so remote, so high in the mountains and believe it or not just last week, with there was a situation where 180 people were found dead. as well as all the snow melt that is going on so we're talking about this area here, tajikistan to the north, pakistan. , very mountainous. this is the area of afghanistan with pakistan pakista pakistan e east. when it does get wet it doesn't hold the water very well, across
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that region. i want to go a little bit close nein with google earth. very, very dry, very steep areas in this area. unfortunately most of the roads going into this region are considered secondary roads and not really capable of handling the type of machinery that they need to get in. and as david said we're talking about in some of the areas mud is anywhere from 30 to 90 feet thick. unfortunately david we're going to be seeing in this area over the next couple of days, i looked over the forecast and another two to three inches falling over the region. >> kevin corriveau, thanks for update, we appreciate it.(p) health officials have discovered a sars like virus, in indiana.
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jacob ward explains. >> mercemers, feefer, cough, shortness of breath. the reason this is so concern there is no specific treatments, no vaccine, no treatment for mers. they can't actually turning thing around completely. mers is a very dangerous affliction. of the 262 cases, 93 patients died. that's a 35% fatality rate. which makes mers more deadly than a case of smallpox in an unvaccinated person, or sars, mers is bad news. it's beyond the reach of medicine at the moment. all they can do with this particularity patient is isolate them, give them oxygen and hope nobody else came in close contact with them.
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but they headed from saudi arabia, to london, and then headed to new york. spread it anywhere along that trip. we don't know where mers came from but it probably originates in animals. the virus has been found in bats and antibodies were found in camels, but we don't know if either of these animals were the point of origin of this disease and we don't know how humans would have contracted from it animalit fromanimals. it's a question of time and money and commitment and now that the illness has hit our shores, time and money might be worth it. the time for developing a vaccine like this may very well be at hand. >> the u.s. labor department released the april jobs report today and it found that employers created 288,000 new
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jobs last month and for first time in six years the unemployment rate fell to 6.3%. for more on all of this let's go to "rea "real money"'s ali vels. what do you feel? >> i fell out of my bed on that amount. my focus instead on the number of jobs that were added. the number of net new jobs that's new jobs minus jobs lost. 288,000 new jobs in april, most of them came from the private sector. that is a big acceleration in job growth compared to the first three months of this year. and when the number of jobs added in january and february, averaged 100,000 less, about 199,000. that's a big -- 189,000. that is a big deal. both presidential candidates said they could build about
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250,000 net new jobs a month, most people like me didn't think that away possible -- 32 was possible. the unemployed people out of a job for six months or more came down by about the same number, 287,000. so this was a mostly glass half full jobs report. and the glass away pretty full. >> ali i love to talk about the political impact of all ever this because we have a mid term election in about six months from now. the reports look great but not all rosy. >> not all rosy. the number of people counted as employed has come down to 1.i 9 million. 9.1 million actively working for work, 806,000 people just pearnld stopped work for -- apparently stopped look for work last month.
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slipped back down a little bit, 62.8%. look at about 1998, 1999 and you see about 2000. this is where it was at its height above 67%. we're now a little below 63%. that means people have stopped looking for work. now that is -- it is hard to know what to make of that david because sometimes it is people who retire or go to prison or get married and decide they don't have to work anymore. but analysts say that's people who left the workforce and won't return. that could be a bad thing. >> ali, thanks for joining us we appreciate it. >> all right david. >> general motors is trying shut down lawsuits over a massive recall into defective ignition switches. gm executives appeared today in front of a bankruptcy judge in new york city. gm says its restructuring plan shields it from lawsuits
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stemming for situations that occurred before 2009. rising tide of lawsuits over the fault, causing at least 13 deaths. still ahead on al jazeera america, catching kids before they flow through the cracks. how a florida school is helping kids reach their graduation day. >> and the british politician who got pelted with an egg. that's next in today's power politics. vé
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>> in today's power politics, the jeb bush presidential campaign is gaining steam with or without the candidate. pledging support four the florida governor the political world woke up this morning with a front page story in the new york times, with reports that the fund raisers are now telling the christie camp their loyalty will change if bush enters the
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race. the key word, as if. barbara bush says she believes the country has had enough bushes in the house but george h.w. bush says he wants jeb to run and george w. bush says he wants his brother to run as well. >> i hope jeb would run. i think he would be a great president. i have no clue what's on his mind and we'll talk when he's ready. >> staying in the lone star state. another high profile american is thinking of entering the campaign. rick perry is considering. and just got the equivalent of a walk off home run. toyota just announced it's moving its hawr headquarters frm
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california to suburban dallas. texas is already number 1 on job creation in the nation. in the 2014 congressional mid term elections house speaker john boehner made the enormous that many of his rank and file campaigners were hoping for it will a new select committee to investigate the terrorist attack in benghazi. four americans were killed. conflicting accounts about what it knew at the time, several congressional committees have already conducted investigations, boehner insists there are now more questions than other. earlier this week house minority leaderness nancleaderness nancye gop is trying to divert voters attention. >> i just saw subtir fuj. th --subter
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subterfuge. >> there was a scary moment in british politics. the leader of the independence party was about to campaign when a protester attacked him. thankfully the weapon of choice was an egg. still, here is the coverage from the bbc. >> let's just show you these pictures that have just come into the building these rate, vy quickly, ushered into a car. >> protester was arrested. as for mr. farrag went to a locl pub, cleaned off and ordered a beer. that is today's power politics. the u.s. department of
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education sets the graduation rate ask as high as it's ever been. but graduation for african american and hispanic students continue to lag behind. now a florida company is using data mining. natasha guinane reports. >> matt says he spent the majorities of his 17 years as a gang member and a drug dealer. >> his life was so desperate the sophomore was planning on dropping out of miami school this year so he could make money. >> surviving trying ton the man of the house when my dad left. everything started when my dad left. i really needed him. >> but he says his planned changed, thanks to a program called "diplomas now." the theory is that as early as sixth grade you can spot children who might drop out of
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school. borrowing from data mining, sorting through statistics to diagnose problems. each week a team of teachers and others meet in what they call the war room to identify students liked godby, who are in. >> even examine of accomplishing what they are campaignable of doing. >> diplomas now began as a pilot program in a philadelphia school six years ago. now it's operating in 40 million dollars and high schools across the country. in the first year, the diplomas now team arrived, miami's graduating rate went from 42% to 87%. >> its a monumental.
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>> ways to saver. ree this are frs utu.s. departmt of education. is. >> godbey says he is now determined to boost the statistics of school by graduating. natasha guinane, al jazeera, miami, florida. dozens of more girls may have been kidnapped from school than originally thought. a new law in florida will give children of grants a chance
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at higher education. >> drug wars in mexico >> this guy saw someone they suspect and they just went after them >> now vigilantes have joined the fight >> i don't want to do this... >> is it a popular uprising? or a new wave of violence? >> fault lines... al jazeera america's hard hitting... >> they're locking the door... ground breaking... >> we have to get out of here... truth seeking... award winning documentary series mexico's vigilante state
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only on al jazeera america
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>> crucial mid term elections this year, florida law make rs have taken a 10 to push the immigration debate ahead and generate more appeal from politicians from hispanic voters. republican governor rick scott has said he supports the provision in recent weeks and expected to sign the bill into law. if he does florida would have been the latest state to push it's immigration policy jason johnson joins us now. explain the politics on all of this. >> it's called 14% of the vote is hispanic in florida. he's in this hard campaign
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against charlie crist. they were both against giving the dreamers in-state tuition. now they are both in favor of it. i don't know if it changes the dynamic very much. >> what does crist say about this? is he facing his own questions about it? >> exactly, they are both being questioned. we both know that christ is a flip-flopper, he was running as republican now he's democrat. he's also been in favor ar stand your ground laws. it may be too little too late, for an election that's not that far away.
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>> republicans generally have a lot of work to do. do you see this as a trend in other states? >> well, it is. you've seen this happening in places as far as utah and virginia. you know republicans are sort of coming around. but here's the problem. if you keep treating me bad for years and then you show up to my front door with flowers it doesn't mean i'm going to let you in. latino and african american voters, they come up with these symbolic policies which are helpful but they have bad record on some issues like immigration. florida california even nevada it may make a difference. >> if the tea party notoriously antiamnesty as they call it what's been their reaction to what florida's been doing? >> they are absolutely furious. they think it's a betrayal by rick scott. the problem is, as more and more
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people in that state complain, saying this is a betrayal of the principles of the state we're allowing this illegals to get in, that's going to be the problem. the florida law doesn't necessarily allow undocumented students to apply. they have to apply in the pool of out of state students. so it's not automatic slam dunk. maybe for those eight to 10,000 students who are eligible they are still competing for those out of state. they are still allowing them to pay in-state tuition though. >> florida and education, former governor jeb bush, any idea where where he is on presidential run? this would play into his hands. >> jeb bush is wavering for his run for president is just about as sincere as hillary clinton's wavering on her decision to run. we'll see if the rest of the
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party will follow suit because that's going to be essential for any republican who wants to win an election in be 2016. >> jason thanks for joining us, great to see you as's. >> thank you. >> you can check out al jazeera america's groundbreaking documentary series borderland, sunday 9:00 p.m. pacific 6:00 pacific on al jazeera america. in yemen, an interior minister says, five fighters were killed in the battles today, sources tell al jazeera that local tribes are trying to get the two sides to stop fighting and allow civilians to leave. yemeni forces are trying to retain control of southern yemen an area roughly the size of new jersey. days before that country hosts an international economics
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conference. 19 people were killed in a bombing outside the capitol, a similar attacked killed 75 people. nigeria's government following the kidnapping of hundreds of school girls. yvon ndege has report. >> initially the unministry said 129 girls were being kid nached. but immediately -- kid flapped. latest development the police say no in fact more than 300 girls were taken away and 276 remain missing. now reason for this confusion at least on the police's part, they say is because there were students attending the school who were only there for exams and they're not normally there,
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hence the inquiries in the numbers. also there are different agencies trying to resolve the assistant. you have the police -- incident. you have police, you have the military, family and parents, and all of them are coming up with different figures as to how many girls were abducted and how many were rescued. one civil rights organization say they have been taken over the border to cameroon and chad, some of them have been forced into marriage, some have been sold for as little as $12 u.s. no verification of these theories. >> killed 11 muslim settlers the attack is believed to be part of an ongoing feud between local tribes and settlers. leading candidate for prime minister suggesting the set lergs bsettlersbeing moved to b.
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links to a murder in 1972. gerry adams used to be the leader of the irish republican army's political wing. the investigation has drawn a lot of criticism from adams supporters. tim friend is in northern ireland with an uh update. >> the deputy foreign minister in northern ireland, a sinn fein leader himself, elements within the police service of northern ireland who he says have been described to him as the dark side. people who are against the peace process, and he says his source for this are the reformers, senior police officers within the same police service. so tension's never far from the
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surface here in northern ireland. old ghosts are quickly revived on occasions and i think everyone is now concerned about this growing crisis. >> back in the united states there are new details about a teenager's foiled plot to kill his family and dozens of his fellow students. maria innes ferre has the story. maria. >> the teen allegedly planned to murder his family and friends, exploafn devices were found on a playground. a 911 caller laterrer spotted a male opening a nearby storage ubility. they found a notebook outlining his plan. he was charged as a juvenile with possession of explosives. >> state prison chief robert
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patelton says three being drugs used to cause technical execution were not-k inserting an if iv inserted into his groi. the 16-year-old boy accused of murdering his classmate right before their junior prom made his first public appearance in court today. christopher plaxon didn't speak during his arraignment. his lawyer said plaxon exhibits signs of coast psychosis and in skew side watch. dramatic street collapse. oh my god. >> half a dozen cars sank on
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wednesday. the street was battered by heavy rain for two days and finally buckled. now officials say that residents can't return to that block for about 40 days. and there's a nearby school there that wasn't open on wednesday. >> yet they're willing to let people stand right there when the street collapsed. maria, thanks, we appreciate it. severe weather in the united states touched an estimated 75 million lives. 37 lives were lost. as robert ray found out firsthand some of the nation's poorest people are not sure if they will be able to start over. >> reporter: in the poorest state in america, life just got tougher. i ain't got no house ain't got no placed to lay my head. got to do something. >> reporter: more of a third
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of lewisville mississippi's residents, lewis reliance on a disability check, just $300 a month. >> no where tolls go. find me somewhere else to rest my head. until i leave the world. >> in the last two years two other tornadoes have touched down here. each time dennis stayed, thinking it could never happen again. >> then it hit the apartments and then they fix them and build them back. but this time, this 4 did it, no fixing back. >> so much of lewisville, mississippi looks like this, many from this apartment complex are scattered around in shelters. they have no place else to go. two people lost their lives. one man was crushed by debris. another one was passed to the
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field and passed away. >> we complete yolanda triplet, she is sleeping on a cot and grieving the loss of her neighbors. >> some of them didn't make it. >> yolanda is one of dozens here unsure of how they will afford to start again. while the shelter is temporary, state and federal aid is on the way. along with plans to set up a multiagency service center to help homeless survivors. >> we all will work with them to help make a plan for their recovery. >> a recovery that dennis dear desperately needs. with no savings no renter's insurance and no prospects. he is slinging to the life he almost lost. >> i don't know what i want to
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do, i which i know. >> robert ray, al jazeera, lewisville, mississippi. >> still ahead, on al jazeera america. the new effort to make our fruits and vegetables tastier and more resistant to bacteria. but is it safe? and case he of sexual assault are on the rise in the u.s. military. we will talk to a former navy officer who was among first to bring attention to the problem.
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>> secretary of defense chaiblg is you as a result of more victims willing to come forward. >> i was groped, grabbed, and
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really fought for my life. they were trying to remove my clothes. i was knocked to the floor. >> that was 22 years ago. paula was a navy lieutenant attending the tail hook convention of aviators. he reported the incident to her commanding officers. >> he told me, that is what you get when you go down the hall filled with drunk eighth yaiaviators.victims advocates fa lawsuit this week claiming thousands of soldiers have suffered similar consequences. >> if i can go left i go right and do this that and the other. >> they were planning a hazing and it just turned into more than that. >> resulting in devastating long
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term psychological injuries. correlate with.ptsd about getting better. >> last year we had a 50% increase in sexual assault reports, which is unprecedented. >> why is any number of sexual assaults appropriate or success in our military? the number of reports may have increased and nobody really is sure exactly why. except the number of prosecutions have not increased. so i don't think that we're really making any headway. >> the issue renewed a debate, over the code of military justice in sex cases.
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senator mccaskel, recent sweeping reforms continue to take root and more victims have confidence in the system to come out of the shadows. but senator giillibrand is said, our current military code of justice remains broken. >> if the commanding officer has this concept that it was somehow the victim's fault, some kind of crossed signals or some kind of communication problem and he believes or she believes that the victim is somehow accountable for this assault, then we've got an unhealthy culture. >> in its latest report, the defense department says more than half of the case ever sexual assault came from men.
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randall pinkston, a al jazeera. >> researchers are trying to create the perfect produce. >> mini bell peppers, perfect for one. beefed up broccoli that boosts your antioxidants. and lettuce with the crunch of iceberg and the nutrients of rowroyroromaine. he's working on the perfect medicalon for fresh cut fruit market. >> we're looking for the high shelf life, something that doesn't have a lot of juice with you cut it into pieces. >> why that specific trait? >> we're trying to create a
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watewaterwatermelon that holds r in a cup. >> they are using their biotech know-how to speed up a process farmers have been using for thousands of years. crossbreeding. marlon edwards is the head of research and development for monsanto's lab. >> characteristic the dna whether that particular plant or seed has properties that scientists are looking for. >> that imarker assisted breedig program. >> what is this marker? >> little stretches of dna that act as a sign post that tell us a little bit what's going on in that neighborhood in the national plan. >> are you actually manipulating
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the genome at all a? >> no, we are marking it, we characteristic the sample but never change the plant. >> marita davidson could not joan us but "techknow"'s phil torres joins us. it sounds complicated is it? >> crossbreeding is very simple. the same thing we've done for thousands of years. a lettuce that is more disease resistant, you crossbreed that with a lettuce that tastes better. hopefully the outcome is both in the same form. monsanto is trying to do that. >> genetic modification is more to the point. you cut the gene out of one organizorganism, stick it into r
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one, they can end up with an end result, crossbreeding takes a lot longer. monsanto is trying to make this go quicker. is. >> the key question is, is it safe? >> absolutely. they are just using gents to beo be more precise which plant with which plant. >> speaking of accurate you have an intriguing accurate piece about spiders. >> yes, absolutely. what do goats and bullet proof vets and a million dollar industry have in common? the answer is spider silk. the biomedicine of the future. it will be night your body, it will be everywhere. they just got to figure out how to make a lot of it. >> phil will tell us more about that on "techknow," sat, 7:30,
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430 on the west coast. phil thank you for joining us. >> thank you. still to come, putting an age old question to rest, new evidence how the.jeentians build the famous picture midst.
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>> a police department live-tweeting a prostitution ring sting? that's what's set to happen. maria innes ferre is following the reaction on line, maria. >> it says pgpd to live prostitution sting. they put up this image of a woman getting arrested. this sting generated so many reaction is in the last 24 hours that the police department deletethis picture and sent out another message that the sting
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would pinpoint the johns not the prostitutes. pgpd is not trying to protect and serve just degrade. sam says i'm glad i don't live in maryland, this is so wrong on so many levels. lisa writes as a woman who lives in pgc, i appreciate this kind of work to eradicate crime in our country. thanks for locking up the johns. and karen writes, kudos to the pgpd for not only the laws but sharing with the community how they do it. they may tweet out the pictures of the john, everything is public 98 when someone gets
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arrested for the crime. david. >> maria innes ferre thank you for sharing. ancient egyptians moved blocks of stone to build the pyramids. jake how does one move an 80-ton block of stone across the sand? >> well david really that's the big question we've all been fighting about. if you look behind me the golden gate bridge here in san francisco 85 years ago was a miracle of science. moving 80 ton blocks of limestone without the use of electricity or hydraulics or anything stronger than copper. there is however a painting on the wall of an ancient fa pharah which shows a sculpture of him
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being pulled by, 80 ton block a big block like this, across dry sand, across the desert it against to form a short of growing wall of sand in front of it that ully makes it impossible to full forward. instead the university of amsterdam found that if you throw enough water into the mix, not too much not too little, it forms a it was really just simple physics. >> i got it right there, simple physics of using water on the sand. does this mean the mystery of how the pyramids have been built is solved?
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>> it's only halfway solved. we don't know how at this point these rocks were put up onto the pyramids themselves. they center on the theory that a big ramp was used to get the rocks up there. but there isn't archaeological evidence of the long ramp. there could have been a sort of zigzagging ramp went up the side or one around the perimeter of the pyramid. it might have been that they recycled the ramps into the pyramids themselves, at least now we know in fact i.t. was just a really smart use of fluid dynamics that got these stones from the quarry to the pyramid site. >> these egyptians were far advanced when it came to math and science. jacob ward, we appreciate it. italian scientists say they
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have found tiny fractures in the being ankles of the statute david. i'm david shuster, following this is real money with ali velshi. job growth just kicked in to high gear, but too many americans have given up looking for work. i'll talk to one boss who says he is hiring right now. also what america could learn from germany about jobs and training skilled workers. plus prayers and property, i'll show you how the real estate market has been a blessing for churches looking to sell. i'm ali velshi, and this is "real ne